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Visiting Artist Series: Juilliard Quartet

  • Conservatory Concert Hall YST Conservatory Singapore, 117376 Singapore (map)

Please note that this event will happen on the 16th of October as opposed to what was earlier advertised on our printed calendar. We apologise for the inconvenience caused. 


JUILLIARD QUARTET

ARETA ZHULLA, violin
RONALD COPES, violin
ROGER TAPPING, viola
ASTRID SCHWEEN, cello

 

PROGRAMME

BEETHOVEN            
String Quartet in D major, Op. 18 No. 3
I. Allegro
II. Andante con moto
III. Allegro
IV. Presto

LEMBIT BEECHER    
One Hundred Years Grows Shorter Over Time 

Intermission

DVOŘÁK              
String Quartet in F major, Op. 96, "American"
I. Allegro ma non troppo
II. Lento
III. Molto vivace
IV. Finale. Vivace ma non troppo

ABOUT JUILLIARD QUARTET

With unparalleled artistry and enduring vigour, the Juilliard String Quartet continues to inspire audiences around the world with its performances.  Founded in 1946, and widely known as “the quintessential American string quartet,” the Juilliard draws on a deep and vital engagement with the classics, while embracing the mission of championing new works – a vibrant combination of the familiar and the daring.  Each performance of the Juilliard Quartet is a unique experience, bringing together the four members’ profound understanding, total commitment, and unceasing curiosity in sharing the wonders of the string quartet literature.  

The Quartet continues its acclaimed annual performances in Detroit, Philadelphia, and at the Ravinia Festival, along with numerous concerts at home in New York City, including appearances at Lincoln Center and Town Hall.  


ABOUT LEMBIT BEECHER'S "ONE HUNDRED YEARS GROWS SHORTER OVER TIME" 

One Hundred Years Grows Shorter Over Time was written in honor of the 100th anniversary of South Mountain Concerts for the Juilliard String Quartet.

As I began writing I thought about the span of 100 years: how, over time, our lives turn into stories told by our children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren, the complications and subtleties of life crystalizing into anecdotes as actual memories fade. The three movements of this quartet are like successive generations retelling the same story. Musical material is passed from movement to movement, but along the way it is reinterpreted and reshaped into something quite different. The movements all share a similar obsessiveness of character, moments of exuberance, and a tendency for long lines to emerge out of faster, restless music, but each movement is shorter, slower, and more focused than the previous one. As I wrote, I kept thinking about a melody, a waltz written by my Estonian granduncle Ilmar Kiiiss, now in his mid-90s. He had written the waltz in the 1950s after the Soviet occupation of Estonia and I had first played this music with my violinist brother when we were teenagers. Over the years we have kept returning to it and I gradually let the waltz into this piece. It is hidden or just hinted at in the first two movements but in the third it appears fully realized if a bit scratchy, as if an old recording, both beautiful and out-of-context, was re-discovered by a future generation.

TICKETING INFORMATION

• Free admission via Eventbrite registration.
• All event information is correct at time of print.
• Out of respect for other concertgoers, no children under 6 years of age will be allowed admission.